MyCoPortal Natural History Collections and Observation Projects


PH

Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University

Contact: Dr. Jordan Teisher (jkt56@drexel.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 591ea70b-223c-4ab8-aad8-9673dfc69cce
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Digital Metadata: EML File


ACAD

Acadia University, E. C. Smith Herbarium

Established in 1910, the E.C. Smith Herbarium contains over 200,000 specimens, including vascular plants, bryophytes, and fungi. It is the largest herbarium in Atlantic Canada and the first Canadian herbarium to have digital database with scanned images of the collection.
Contact: Ruth Newell (ruth.newell@acadiau.ca)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 17 November 2015
Digital Metadata: EML File


ETH

Addis Ababa University, observation-based

Contact: Sebsebe Demissew (sebseb.demissew@gmail.com)
Home Page: www.aau.edu.et/
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 0a7cfcc3-6245-4c9a-acec-8552c48b5d54
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Digital Metadata: EML File


ETH

Addis Ababa University, specimen-based

Contact: Sebsebe Demissew (sebseb.demissew@gmail.com)
Home Page: www.aau.edu.et/
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: a0140b8b-c6a7-447a-9c4e-699652c8a7cc
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Digital Metadata: EML File


N/A

Atlas of Living Australia observation-based fungal data

Contact: Tom May (Tom.May@rbg.vic.gov.au)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 23 August 2018
Digital Metadata: EML File


N/A

Atlas of Living Australia specimen-based fungal data

Contact: Tom May (Tom.May@rbg.vic.gov.au)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 23 August 2018
Digital Metadata: EML File


BMSC

Bamfield Marine Science Centre

The 2018 Field Mycology students at Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre collected fungi from the area. The collections are stored in the BMSC herbarium. Course instructors: John Klironomos, Dan Durall, Bryce Kendrick Teaching Assistant: Anna Bazzicalupo
Contact: Elizabeth Rogers, Librarian (library@bamfieldmsc.com)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 90ccfdef-ca66-40a1-b8aa-ae2681f1f31d
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Digital Metadata: EML File


BISH

Bishop Museum, Herbarium Pacificum

The Herbarium Pacificum (BISH) collection consists of more than 710,000 plant, algae and fungi specimens. Our emphasis is on Hawai‘i and the Pacific Basin, but we also house representative material from other world regions. The collection of Hawaiian fungi contains approximately 15,100 specimens.
Contact: Barbara Kennedy, Collections Manager (bkennedy@bishopmuseum.org)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 3 December 2015
Digital Metadata: EML File


BRIT

Botanical Research Institute of Texas

Over one million plant specimens are housed in the BRIT Herbarium (the combined BRIT-SMU and VDB collections), making this the largest independent herbarium in the southeastern US. The herbarium has strengths in the plants of Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Tennessee, the Gulf Coast, and the southeastern United States. However, these collections are worldwide in scope, and most of the Earth’s plant families are represented here. Two of our current research projects, one in Peru and one in Papua New Guinea, have greatly expanded the scope of our collection of tropical specimens.
Contact: Tiana Rehman (trehman@brit.org)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: e930b44a-b92c-4727-a697-c816960bc747
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Digital Metadata: EML File


N/A

Brazil SpeciesLink Fungi data from iDigBio

Contact:
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 20 March 2017
Digital Metadata: EML File


BRU

Brown University Herbarium

The Brown University Herbarium was founded in 1869 when the University acquired the collections of the Providence Franklin Society and Stephen Thayer Olney. The collection includes around 100,000 plant specimens and is an important depository of Rhode Island and New England collections. It is also rich in western and southern North American plants and includes special sets of historically valuable specimens from 19th and early 20th century western US expeditions. Among other important collections, the herbarium also includes a full set of Charles Wright’s Cuban plants (1856-1867) and a unique and classic collection of Carex.
Contact: Rebecca Kartzinel (Rebecca_Kartzinel@brown.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: c1da60fd-2e8c-40b4-adf6-8c886db4062f
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Digital Metadata: EML File


CHSC

California State University Chico, Chico State Herbarium

Primarily North America, emphasis on northern California; 10,400 myxomycetes, many from Donald Kowalski and 1487 from the personal collection of Dwayne Curtis.
Contact: Lawrence Janeway, Curator (LJaneway@csuchico.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 8b1d736a-fa23-4acc-8b29-4f6bc87124d8
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Digital Metadata: EML File


CLEMS

Clemson University Herbarium

The Clemson University Herbarium is dedicated to the acquisition and distribution of information on the taxonomy, biogeography and conservation of native species of the southeastern United States. It is one of the largest collections in the state and serves as a more or less permanent documentation of the flora of South Carolina. The herbarium is maintained as a research and educational tool available to Clemson University students, faculty and staff as well as interested individual researchers from throughout the world.
Contact: Dixie Damrel (ddamrel@clemson.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: eb2f20db-b912-405a-8241-fd0be2b0330a
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Digital Metadata: EML File


HCOA

College of the Atlantic, Acadia National Park Herbarium

The College of the Atlantic/Acadia National Park Herbarium (HCOA) maintains a collection of over 12,000 dried specimens; most are from coastal Maine, but there are also plants from elsewhere in the United States and Canada. The herbarium's major collections include the Plants of Acadia National Park and the Plants of Coastal Maine – the latter collection was compiled by the noted naturalist Dr. William H. Drury, Jr., one of COA's earliest faculty members. The macrofungi collection is comprised of 648 specimens, the majority of which were collected by Walter Litten, associate faculty in mycology. Of the 648 specimens, 257 are from Acadia National Park.
Contact: Geneva Langley (genevaerin@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: bf2e2bce-8361-407d-8d28-e52424f1b278
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Digital Metadata: EML File


CUP

Cornell University, Plant Pathology Herbarium

The Cornell Plant Pathology Herbarium (CUP) is a large research collection of preserved fungi and other organisms that cause plant diseases. CUP is the fourth largest mycological herbarium in North America. We hold about 400,000 fungus and plant disease specimens, including over 8000 type specimens. Our main geographic strength is northeastern North America, but we also hold important collections from the tropics including the Caribbean, Mexico, South America, Southeast Asia and Macaronesia. Our collections include many rare fungal exsiccati as well as many authors' herbaria (Atkinson, Durand, Fairman, Gremmen, Honey, Korf, Stewart, Welch). The CUP Photograph Collection supplements our specimens and comprises roughly 60,000 historical, scientific photographs of mushrooms, agricultural practices, plant diseases, and portraits of scientists.
Contact: Kathie T. Hodge (cup-herbarium@cornell.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 30 April 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File

Cryptogamic Russian Information System (CRIS) Observational Data

Contact: Alexey V. Melekhin (melihen@yandex.ru)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 12 October 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


DEWV

Davis & Elkins College Herbarium

The Davis & Elkins College Herbarium (DEWV) contains over 10,000 vouchers of macrofungi of West Virginia. This is an ongoing project documenting the distribution and diversity of macrofungi in the state. The project has yielded several new state records, including the discovery of species that have not previously been scientifically described. The herbarium also contains approximately 2,000 vascular plants.
Contact: Michelle Mabry (mabrym@dewv.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 31 March 2014
Digital Metadata: EML File


DBG-DBG

Denver Botanic Gardens, Sam Mitchel Herbarium of Fungi

Specialty: Fleshy fungi, ascomycetes, gasteromycetes, and Cortinariaceae of the Rocky Mountain region, mostly Colorado. Housed at Denver Botanic Gardens. Date Founded: 1963. Higher resolution images are available upon request.
Contact: Andrew Wilson, Assistant Curator (andrew.wilson@botanicgardens.org)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 881dbacb-effd-4a6a-b4f4-45da2579e689
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Digital Metadata: EML File


DUKE

Duke University, Herbarium Fungal Collection

The Duke Fungal Herbarium was established by Duke mycologist Dr. Rytas Vilgalys in the early 1990's. The Herbarium consists mainly of Basidiomycete collections with special emphasis on Agaricomycetes. Specimens of Septobasidium, collected by Dr. Daniel Henk for his dissertation research, and dissertation research vouchers of truffles (Tuber) of Dr. Greg Bonito are accessioned in our holdings. Rich in new collections from Australia, New Zealand, Italy, Newfoundland and Labrador, Columbia, South Africa and the United States. Significant collections from Papua New Guinea, France, Costa Rica and China.
Contact: Rytas Vilgalys (fungi@duke.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 1231eb25-bc07-4174-9660-69fe787f1c2e
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Digital Metadata: EML File


EIU

Eastern Illinois University

The fungal collections of EIU emphasize macrofungi from Midwestern and southeastern North America with additional collections from the Pacific Coast of North America, Belgium, Belize, Costa Rica, Russia, Sweden, and New Zealand. There are approximately 15,000 specimens in the herbarium which are pertinent to this project, including vouchers for the studies of Andrew Methven and students (e.g., Hustad et al, 2011; Miller and Methven, 2000; Methven, 1997; Methven, 1990). EIU also houses approximately 15,000 photographic slides, 7,500 digital images, and 15,000 field notes stored with the specimens collected by Methven and students.
Contact: Andrew Methven (asmethven@eiu.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: c6b69566-dbc2-4880-beff-0de0e8b4531d
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Digital Metadata: EML File


QCAM

Ecuador Fungi data from FungiWebEcuador

FungiWebEcuador is an open access portal dedicated specifically to the publication of fungal diversity in Ecuador. The mission of FungiWeb is to present the most complete information about macro mushrooms in the country, which are deposited in the fungarium QCAM (Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador). CITATION: Ordoñez, M. E. 2018. Base de datos del Fungario QCAM. Versión 1.0. Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador. Disponible en Consulta: (Lunes, 24 de Septiembre de 2018).
Contact: Maria Eugenia Ordoñez (MEORDONEZ@puce.edu.ec)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 27 September 2018
Digital Metadata: EML File


BAFC-H

Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales

La Colección BAFC-H, fue fundada en 1955 y está registrada desde 1959 en el Index Herbariorum. Es una Colección que alberga alrededor de 30000 especímenes de hongos secos argentinos y de otros países del mundo. Entre ellos se encuentran colecciones destacadas como las pertenecientes a I. Gamundi, M. Rajchenberg, R. Singer y J. E. Wright. Dicha Colección cuenta con alrededor de 200 tipos argentinos, como así también de otros países. El Cepario (Colección de Hongos vivos), a su vez, cuenta con 3500 cepas vivas conservadas en frío, liofilizadas o en vaselina. Ambas están vinculadas y mantienen intercambio con Instituciones similares del resto del país y del mundo. Las colecciones de hongos tienen gran importancia para la conservación del recurso genético y de la biodiversidad, y constituyen fuentes de referencia, certificación e investigación. Dada la función de resguardo de material e información que implica una Colección, es fundamental la accesibilidad a éstos, tanto en forma concreta como virtual. Es por ello, que la Colección BAFC-H ofrece “Investigación in situ”, Préstamo de ejemplares y Colección virtual a través del portal del GBIF, SNDB y Mycoportal
Contact: Andrea Romero (romero@bg.fcen.uba.ar)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 1 October 2016
Digital Metadata: EML File


F

Field Museum of Natural History

Additional electronic access to F database is available at: http://emuweb.fieldmuseum.org/botany/Query.php. Specialty: Phanerogams worldwide with emphasis on tropical and North America, especially rich in collections from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, and Peru; pteridophytes worldwide with emphasis on Guatemala, Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Peru; bryophytes worldwide; mosses of North America, Central America, Andean South America, and Australasia; hepatics of north temperate, South America, and south temperate; all groups of fungi, especially basidiomycetes with emphasis on New World and lichenized fungi of north temperate and Central America; economic botany.

Contact: Wyatt Gaswick (wgaswick@fieldmuseum.org)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 5 February 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File
Access Rights: http://fieldmuseum.org/about/copyright-information


FNL

Foray Newfoundland and Labrador Fungarium

Contact: Michael Burzynski (burzynski@nf.sympatico.ca)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 24 January 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


FNL

Foray Newfoundland and Labrador, observation-based

Contact: Michael Burzynski (burzynski@nf.sympatico.ca)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 24 January 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


FLD

Fort Lewis College Herbarium

The fungal collection of FLD contains approximately 1700 specimens of principally wood decay and macrofungi with a geographic focus on southwestern Colorado and the greater southwestern United States. The collection was started and built up by Dr. J. Page Lindsey who worked at Fort Lewis College from 1978-2009. FLD also includes a vascular plant collection consisting of ca. 14,000 specimens. The vascular plant collection is fully databased and searchable via the Southwest Environmental Information Network (SEINet).
Contact: Ross A. McCauley (mccauley_r@fortlewis.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 42ce404f-1ab4-4275-ad1a-1978347d4c17
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Digital Metadata: EML File


British Mycological Society

Fungal Records Database of Britain and Ireland

The Fungal Records Database of Britain and Ireland (a.k.a. BMSFRD) contains records of fungi from forays of the British Mycological Society, various surveys (e.g. SNH waxcap grassland survey), forays of the many local recording groups, individuals, and published records of British fungi from the Transactions of the British Mycological Society, the Bulletin, and their successors: Mycological Research, Mycologist, Field Mycology and other publications (data collection sponsored by JNCC; see Cannon, Mycologist 12(1): 25, 1998). See more at: https://basidiochecklist.science.kew.org/BritishFungi/FRDBI/FRDBI.asp
Contact:
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 12 September 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File

Fungal records database of Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug – Yugra

The mycological research in Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug – Yugra stems from isolated studies in the beginning of the 20th century, but regular and systematic research dates back to the 1970-80s. Over the following decades several dozens of researches have worked in the area and a total of about 150 scientific works have been published. No attempts to summarize the results of previous works and to create a regional checklist have been accomplished before. Fungal Records Database of Yugra (FReDY) was developed to accumulate the results of previous studies published up to date. The FReDY database includes 22 fields describing species name, publication source, herbarium number, date of sampling, geography, vegetation, substrate, and some other ecological features. Records in the database were collected from previously published works, e.g. results of inventories of fungi in the region. The herbarium specimens or other unpublished records were not included in the database at this stage. Presently, the dataset includes about 12,000 of fungal records in the region and adjacent areas, reported from 77 scientific publications. According to the database summary report, there are about 2,600 species and subspecies taxa identified within KHMAO up-to-date. The richest studied groups are Agaricoid basidiomycetes (30%), Lichens (37%) and Aphyllophoroid basidiomycetes (19%). The less studied groups are Ascomycetes (9%), Myxomycetes (3%), Heterobasidiomycetous fungi, Yeasts and Rusts (<1%).
Contact: Nina Filippova (filippova.courlee.nina@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 17 October 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


FH

Harvard University, Farlow Herbarium

The Farlow Herbarium houses nearly 1,400,000 specimens of lichenized and non-lichenized fungi, bryophytes, and algae. The collections are world-wide in scope; particular strengths are in bound, indexed exsiccatae, bryophytes and fungi from Asia, entomogenous fungi, Antarctic lichens, and special "authors" herbaria which contain many type specimens. The Herbarium also has an associated library, The Farlow Reference Library, including the Archives of the Farlow Herbarium of Cryptogamic Botany. Currently, the New England Botanical Club cryptogamic collection is also housed in the Farlow Herbarium.
Contact: Donald H. Pfister (dpfister@oeb.harvard.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 18 October 2019
IPT / DwC-A Source:
Digital Metadata: EML File
Rights Holder: President and Fellows of Harvard College
Access Rights: http://kiki.huh.harvard.edu/databases/addenda.html#policy


RET

Herbarium Amanitarum Rooseveltensis

Herbarium Amanitarum Rooseveltensis (RET; established ca. 1977) contains approximately 5,000 vouchers of species of the Amanitaceae (Agaricales, Basidiomycetes) from throughout the world, but with a focus on the Western Hemisphere. The herbarium serves as the primary repository of material revised and/or published by R.E. Tulloss and co-authors (extensively referenced on www.amanitaceae.org). More than 10% of the collections have been sampled for molecular studies on Amanitaceae or associated organisms (e.g., yeasts) growing on their fruiting structures. A number of collections have been also been sampled for other research projects, including studies on hyperaccumulation in agarics of silver and other metals.
Contact: Rodham E. Tulloss (ret@eticomm.net)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 8 October 2012
Digital Metadata: EML File


FR

Herbarium Senckenbergianum

The Herbarium Senckenbergianum Frankfurt/M. (FR) of the Senckenbergische Gesellschaft für Naturforschende Frankfurt/M., founded in 1817, houses more than 1.2 million collections and ranks among the largest herbaria in Germany. Three-quarters of these are phanerogams. The cryptogam collection contains approximately 55,000 ferns, 52,000 lichens, 45,000 mosses, and 7,000 algae. Geographically, the collection is focussed on Hesse and Central Europe, but other regions of the globe are well represented, too. These include Ethiopia, Mexico, Cuba, Nicaragua, Japan, Europe, the Mediterranean, the Mid-Atlantic Islands, and the West African Savannah regions (especially Burkina Faso, Bénin, and Nigeria). Since 2009 the Herbarium Senckenbergianum comprises also botanical collections in Görlitz (GLM), Weimar (IQW) and Wilhelmshaven. The fungal herbarium (ca. 40,000 specimens) contains mostly parasitic fungi, many of them in large exsiccata series. The most important collectors are G. Eberle, K. Fuckel, G. J. Herpell, H. Rupprecht and R. Steppan. The lichen herbarium (ca. 78,000 specimens) includes the important historical collections of Jakob Adolf Metzler (with many exsiccata series by Anzi, Arnold, Hepp, Nylander) and Ludwig Scriba as well as contemporary collections.
Contact: Georg Zizka, Director of the Herbarium (georg.zizka@senckenberg.de)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 24 April 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File
Usage Rights: CC BY (Attribution)


iNat

iNaturalist Research Grade Observations

From hikers to hunters, birders to beach-combers, the world is filled with naturalists, and many of us record what we find. What if all those observations could be shared online? You might discover someone who finds beautiful wildflowers at your favorite birding spot, or learn about the birds you see on the way to work. If enough people recorded their observations, it would be like a living record of life on Earth that scientists and land managers could use to monitor changes in biodiversity, and that anyone could use to learn more about nature.
Contact: Ken-ichi Ueda (help@inaturalist.org)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 3 April 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File
Rights Holder: © held by the observer (listed as 'Collector') at iNaturalist.org, with some rights reserved (CC BY-SA)


BPI

Index of the C.G. Lloyd Mycological Collection Specimens Housed at BPI

Curtis Gates Lloyd was a prominent American mycologist active from the late 1880s until his death in 1926. The C. G. Lloyd Mycological Collection was transferred to the United States Department of Agriculture Mycology Collections in 1927 and is currently housed at the USDA Agricultural Research Service U.S. National Fungus Collections (Herbarium BPI) in Beltsville, MD. The Lloyd Collection is likely the largest fungal herbarium ever assembled by a single person and consists of approximately 59,000 specimens. These cards represent the original index to the Lloyd Collection prepared in 1928 and include valuable specimen information and annotations.
Contact: Lisa A. Castlebury (Lisa.Castlebury@ARS.USDA.GOV)
Collection Type: General Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: aff6704d-907d-4c0f-bfe1-0d17e871c0b5
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Digital Metadata: EML File


IASD

Indian Ascomycetes Fungal Database

Contact: Kiran R. Ranadive (ranadive.kiran@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 9aa13f39-ac73-4eba-8890-ef7052e3f2eb
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Digital Metadata: EML File


IMUD

Indian Marine Fungi Database

Contact: Kiran Ranadive (ranadive.kiran@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 06ee4768-8a43-433b-b055-047ca5d77f5c
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Digital Metadata: EML File


IMUD

Indian Mushroom Database

Contact: Kiran Ranadive (ranadive.kiran@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 1f9930ca-80a1-4e15-893f-4e7d205860aa
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Digital Metadata: EML File


IMUD

Indian Myxomycetes Database

Contact: Kiran Ranadive (ranadive.kiran@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: bd9fd533-7c91-4bd4-a23c-8cb66156e6d5
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Digital Metadata: EML File


IRFD

Indian Rust Fungal Database

Contact: Kiran Ranadive (ranadive.kiran@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 0f61660b-fd33-4a9c-9770-af13d93b76da
Live Data Download: Login for access
Digital Metadata: EML File


IND

Indiana University

Contact: Eric Knox (eknox@indiana.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 77f58e89-bce8-4f7e-8784-4785b5a54882
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Digital Metadata: EML File


INEP-F

Institute of the Industrial Ecology Problems of the North of Kola Science Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

There are three collections in the herbarium. The main collection contains vascular plants (1500 specimens), fungi (1600 specimens), lichens (500 specimens) and bryophytes (1320 specimens) from the Murmansk Region and other northern regions. Additionally, the Museum of Bacteria, Algae and Microfungi of the Kola Peninsula includes strains of bacteria (37), algae (200) and microfungi (395) isolated from soils (virgin and polluted by industrial emissions of the «Severonikel» and the «Pechenganikel» enterprises, of the aluminium plant, oil-contaminated), air and anthropogenically altered environment (apatite-nepheline ore, nepheline sands, circulating water of mining plant and others) of Kola Peninsula. Another special collection, Diatoms of the Euro-Arctic Region, includes specimens of diatom complexes from the sediments and biotopes from polytypic ancient and modern water bodies, periphyton and plankton of Euro-Arctic Region: Kola Peninsula (Imandra Lake, River Paz system, mountain lakes and rivers of Khibiny and Chuna-tundra massifs and others), Arkhangelsk region (River Pechora basin), lakes and streams of Novaya Zemlya Island, Svalbard archipelago, Barents, Norwegian, Greenland and Laptev’s Seas. This collection, founded in 1993, contains 150 different specimens (about 3700 slides). First volume of the Fungi Exsiccates from Murmansk Region issued in 2016. The present fascicule includes labels of 15 species: Amylostereum chailletii, Asterodon ferruginosus, Ceraceomyces serpens, Cerioporus mollis, Ceriporiopsis mucida, Clavaria fragilis, Laurilia sulcata, Laxitextum bicolor, Ramariopsis subtilis, Oxyporus populinus, Phellinus laevigatus, Sistotrema confluens, Skeletocutis stellae, Veluticeps abietina, Xanthoporus syringae.
Contact: Maria Korneykova, Curator of the Museum of Bacteria and Microfungi of the Kola Peninsula (korneykova@inep.ksc.ru)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 12 October 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


ICMP

International Collection of Microorganisms from Plants

Specialty: Fungi of New Zealand and islands of southern Pacific. Date Founded: 1936.
Contact: Bevan Weir (WeirB@landcareresearch.co.nz)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 15 October 2019
IPT / DwC-A Source:
Digital Metadata: EML File


ISC

Iowa State University, Ada Hayden Herbarium

Charles Bessey, the founder of the Ada Hayden Herbarium, and his student J. C. Arthur added the earliest fungal specimens to the herbarium's holdings. L. H. Pammel and his students, including George W. Carver, continued to build the mycological collection. Irving E. Melhus was hired as Iowa State's first plant pathologist, and Joseph C. Gilman soon joined Melhus as a mycologist and plant pathologist. Lois H. Tiffany succeeded Drs. Melhus and Gilman as ISC’s mycologist. The prestigious University of Iowa Mycological Herbarium was transferred to ISC in 1984. This collection contains the specimens of George Martin, Thomas H. Macbride, and A. P. Morgan, and is rich in type specimens. Currently the mycological collection contains an estimated 36,000 packeted and boxed specimens.
Contact: Deborah Lewis (dlewis@iastate.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: f25dc2ec-d71d-4014-abb2-c3b64af25d79
Live Data Download: Login for access
Digital Metadata: EML File
Rights Holder: Iowa State University


SUCO

Jewell and Arline Moss Settle Herbarium at SUNY Oneonta

The Jewell and Arline Moss Settle Herbarium is a small regional herbarium containing approximately 15,000 specimens, including vascular plants, bryophytes, lichens, fungi, and algae. The majority of its holdings are from central New York and Adirondack Park. Functioning primarily as a teaching herbarium, it also contains vouchers for New York State county floras and supports molecular and ecological research on plants of New York State.
Contact: Sean C. Robinson (sean.robinson@oneonta.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: b8c321fb-c2ba-4e63-9d12-5dc9ae07961c
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Digital Metadata: EML File


KEAN

Kean University

Contact: Maria Shumskaya (mshumska@kean.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update:
Digital Metadata: EML File
Usage Rights: CC BY (Attribution)
Rights Holder: Maria Shumskaya


LIMC

Long Island Mycological Club

This list represents the species of macrofungi collected and documented by members of the Long Island Mycological Club since its inception in 1973, mostly in the counties of Nassau and Suffolk, although Queens county (part of NYC but geographically Long Island) is also represented. While the habitat is primarily coastal lowland of several types, it is geologically young having been formed by glacial deposition and retreat about 14,000 years ago. Some flora of the southeastern Piedmont and Coastal Plain reach their northern limit in this ecoregion, and that appears true of some macrofungi as well. The Atlantic Coastal Pine Barrens region comprises over 100,000 acres of protected oak-pine forests with a mild maritime climate that permits fungal collecting into December. Some of the unique ecological features that distinguish this ecoregion from mainland ecoregions include its stunted pine and oak forests, numerous kettle ponds, and unique habitats in salt and freshwater marshes, swamps, bogs, and sand dunes.
Contact: Joel Horman (jlhorman@optonline.net)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 17 July 2017
Digital Metadata: EML File


LSUM-Fungi

Louisiana State University, Bernard Lowy Mycological Herbarium

Louisiana State University Bernard Lowy Mycological Herbarium (LSUM) was founded in 1954 and houses ca. 20,000 higher fungi from tropical America and U.S.A.
Contact: Jennifer S. Kluse, Collections Manager (jkluse@lsu.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 8f3d5b53-acea-4e2a-89de-0162fd1ffadb
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Digital Metadata: EML File


N/A

Malta Mycological Association

Contact: Marica Lewis (aciram9@yahoo.com)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 75f3a554-1f72-4849-bcfe-1d806284a2ee
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Digital Metadata: EML File


MU

Miami University, Willard Sherman Turrell Herbarium

The Miami University Herbarium houses approximately 675,000 specimens of vascular plants, bryophytes, algae, lichens, fungi, and fossil plant specimens. The collections are worldwide in scope, with a focus on North America, Ohio, and the Caribbean, with material dating back to the 1790’s. Major fungal collectors include F.W. Anderson, W.B. Cooke, J.B. Ellis, B.M. Everhart, B. Fink, F.O. Grover, F.D. Kelsey, M.L. Lohman, W.A. Murrill, L.O. Overholts, and L.E. Wehmeyer.
Contact: Michael A. Vincent (vincenma@miamioh.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 27151aff-a2aa-428a-8572-8f12c8f9feca
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Digital Metadata: EML File


MSC

Michigan State University Herbarium

The MSU Herbarium was founded in 1863 with the donation of a large collection of plants from Michigan and the eastern U.S. Today, we remain focused on plant and fungal diversity from Michigan, but the collection is also rich in plants from Mexico and southeast Asia, and lichens from the Caribbean and the subantarctic region. With over half a million specimens, the MSU Herbarium is among the 50 largest herbaria in the United States.
Contact: L. Alan Prather (alan@msu.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 9f240f3c-0ebe-463a-b610-4fa9beea74b7
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Digital Metadata: EML File


MSC

MSU Advanced Mycology course - Fall 2018

PLP 847 Advanced Mycology: Systematics, identification, physiology, genetics, and molecular biology of plant pathogenic fungi.
Contact: Gregory Bonito (bonito@mail.msu.edu)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 018acd90-d7ec-4516-979f-433f62b98459
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Digital Metadata: EML File


CR

Museo Nacional de Costa Rica, observation-based

Founded in 1887. The former INB collections are still housed in the same building in Santo Domingo de Heredia where they have been for the last few years (see INB for the exact location), but are now administered by the Museo Nacional. Specimens from INB should now be cited as CR. A database and type photographs are available here: http://ecobiosis.museocostarica.go.cr/especimenes/Buscador.aspx
Contact: Armando Estrada, director (aestrada@museocostarica.go.cr)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 20 December 2018
Digital Metadata: EML File


CR

Museo Nacional de Costa Rica, specimen-based

Founded in 1887. The former INB collections are still housed in the same building in Santo Domingo de Heredia where they have been for the last few years (see INB for the exact location), but are now administered by the Museo Nacional. Specimens from INB should now be cited as CR. A database and type photographs are available here: http://ecobiosis.museocostarica.go.cr/especimenes/Buscador.aspx
Contact: Armando Estrada, director (aestrada@museocostarica.go.cr)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 20 December 2018
Digital Metadata: EML File


MNA

Museum of Northern Arizona

The Museum of Northern Arizona (MNA) is a private, non-profit, member-based institution located in Flagstaff, Arizona at the base of the beautiful San Francisco Peaks. The Museum was founded in 1928 by Harold S. Colton and Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton and was originally established to protect and preserve the natural and cultural heritage of northern Arizona through research, collections, conservation and education. MNA's mission to inspire a sense of love and responsibility for the beauty and diversity of the Colorado Plateau through collecting, studying, interpreting, and preserving the region’s natural and cultural heritage. Located in the Easton Collection Center on MNA’s Research Campus, the McDougall Herbarium focuses on plant and fungi collections from the Colorado Plateau. It contains examples of most of the flora of northern Arizona and is particularly strong in plants of the Grand Canyon region.
Contact: Kirstin Olmon Phillips (kphillips@musnaz.org)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 4ea87621-512f-46de-b814-aaa827eeeb59
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Digital Metadata: EML File

Mushroom Mountain Fungarium

East Coast U.S. (especially Basidiomycetes and some Ascomycetes). Small collection from across Jamaica. Both wild and cultivated specimens. 21st century exsiccatae.
Contact: Tradd Cotter (myceliumtradd@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: fd04e85d-78c5-456d-9ed7-7fae7d24517b
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Digital Metadata: EML File


MUOB

Mushroom Observer

The purpose of Mushroom Observer is to record observations about mushrooms, help people identify mushrooms they aren’t familiar with, and expand the community around the scientific exploration of mushrooms (mycology). Some have asked what counts as a mushroom. This site takes a very broad view. While the emphasis is on the large fleshy fungi, other fungi such as lichens, rust and molds as well as fungus-like organisms such as slime-molds are all welcome. Ultimately, I hope this site will become a valuable resource for both amateur and professional mycologists. I like to think of it as a living field guide for mushrooms or a collaborative mushroom field journal.
Contact: Nathan Wilson (nathan@collectivesource.com)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 22 July 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File
Rights Holder: MO Observers


NAMP-CMS

NAMP - Cascade Mycological Society: Macrofungi of Lane County, Oregon

The aims of this project are to: develop an inventory of the macrofungi of Lane County, Oregon and share data with the North American Mycoflora Project; describe local species (using local and taxon-specific experts) and identifying taxa requiring further study; and provide opportunities for Cascade Mycological Society members as well as Lane Community College and University of Oregon students, and to educate them in the natural sciences via active participation in the project.
Contact: Bitty Roy (bit@uoregon.edu)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 1f33fc75-fb0b-424c-a7bf-7e4790738ac8
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Digital Metadata: EML File


NAMP-NYMS

NAMP - New York Mycological Society: Macrofungi of New York City, New York

This record is a continuation of a long-term project on the part of the New York Mycological Society to record the fungi of New York City. The New York Mycological Society visits parks in the five boroughs of New York City year-round and has recorded over 1,000 species.
Contact: Sigrid Jakob (sigridjakob@gmail.com)
Collection Type: General Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 371e140a-9b98-478a-8fa3-8a07160c3830
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Digital Metadata: EML File


IBUNAM-MEXU:FU

National Herbarium of Mexico Fungal Collection (Hongos del Herbario Nacional de México)

With more than 1.3 million specimens, the National Herbarium of Mexico (MEXU) houses the most important collection of Mexican plants. It is the largest herbarium in Mexico and Latin America, and is one of the ten most active herbaria in the world. This collection is the cumulative work of many generations of both Mexican and foreign botanists and explorers, having been created in the late 19th century with the founding of the National Medical Institute in 1888, and tasked with consolidating knowledge about natural resources. It was acquired by the National University of Mexico (UNAM) in 1929 through the Biology Institute (Instituto de Biologia, IB). The fungal collection was started in 1947 by Drs. Manuel Ruíz-Oronoz and Teófilo Herrera. It currently contains more than 22,000 specimens, representing about 400 genera and 1,500 species of basidiomycetes, ascomycetes and myxomycetes, organized taxonomically. In addition to Mexico City, the states of Hidalgo, Jalisco, Mexico, Morelos, Puebla, Oaxaca, Sonora and Veracruz are especially well represented, with an emphasis on specimens collected in temperate forests, high-altitude perennial forests, and low deciduous forest. The fungarium is strong in collections by Manuel Ruíz-Oronoz, Teófilo Herrera, Evangelina Pérez-Silva and Rafael Hernández. It also includes a collection of phytopathogens, started by Dr. Martha Zenteno in 1958. It comprises over 2,000 specimens from over 300 species of fungi.
Contact: M. en C. Elvira Aguirre-Acosta, Curator (caguirre@ib.unam.mx)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 11 March 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


UT

Natural History Museum of Utah Fungarium

Contact: Bryn Dentinger (bryn.dentinger@utah.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: e3b913b9-0cf2-4db4-871b-7e741c82d9f7
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Digital Metadata: EML File


NBM

New Brunswick Museum

The New Brunswick Museum herbarium houses about 115,000 specimens documenting the diversity, distributions, and habitats of plants and fungi in New Brunswick and other areas of eastern Canada. It is an active regional resource for research, education, and biodiversity conservation. It incorporates the 19th century collections of the Natural History Society of New Brunswick, including much of the material on which the first published catalogue (1879) of the provincial vascular flora was based. In recent decades, the NBM collections of bryophytes, lichens, and fungi have grown considerably; they include international material and exsiccatae. The cryptogams now represent more than two-thirds of the overall holdings of the herbarium.
Contact: Stephen Clayden (Stephen.Clayden@nbm-mnb.ca)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 4 November 2016
Digital Metadata: EML File


NY

New York Botanical Garden

The National Science Foundation has announced a new grant to provide funding for a nationwide, publicly accessible database of mushrooms and related fungi. Including mushrooms, porcini, puffballs, club fungi, conks, morels, stinkhorns, truffles and cup fungi, these organisms play a critical role in the lives of plants and animals, including humans. Some are gastronomical delights, others are deadly poisonous, and all serve as nature’s recyclers, returning nutrients to the soil through decomposition. Scientists in the U.S. have been studying macrofungi for the past 150 years, resulting in a legacy of approximately 1.4 million dried scientific specimens conserved in 35 institutions in 24 states. Through this project, led by Drs. Barbara M. Thiers and Roy E. Halling of The New York Botanical Garden, these treasures will be virtually liberated from their museum cabinets and shared on-line through the Mycology Collections Portal and through many other on-line collections databases such as The Garden’s Virtual Herbarium. The database created by this project will enable a national census of these critically important organisms, and allow researchers to better understand the relationship between macrofungi and other organisms.
Contact: Laura Briscoe (lbriscoe@nybg.org)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 19 December 2019
IPT / DwC-A Source:
Digital Metadata: EML File


NYS

New York State Museum

The fungus collection at the New York State Museum in Albany was initiated by Charles Peck from 1868 to 1913 during which time he amassed 33,600 mycological specimens. In the years following, the next State Botanist, Homer House, and other mycologists added to this number. The collection now contains more than 90,000 specimens. However, the importance of the collection is not in the number of specimens it contains, but, rather, in the type specimens of American fungi collected during the early years of American mycology. It is especially rich in Agarics and other larger fungi. Some of the other collectors represented in the herbarium of the New York State Museum are G. F. Atkinson, M. E. Banning, E. Bartholomew, M. J. Berkeley, E. A. Burt, G. W. Clinton, M. C. Cooke, M. A. Curtis, J. Dearness, J. B. Ellis, W. R. Gerard, E. C. Howe, J. H. Haines, H. W. Harkness, E. W. D. Holway, C. H. Kauffman, W. A. Murrill, P. A. Saccardo, S. J. Smith, and C. J. Sprague. In addition to specimens, the Museum holds numerous original drawings and paintings of fungi by Charles Peck, Mary Banning, and others plus an extensive file of correspondence covering the formative years of American mycology. Non-type specimens are available on loan to recognized scientific institutions for taxonomic research. Requests for samples of type specimens for genetic and morphological analyses are considered on a case-by-case basis.
Contact: Lorinda Leonardi (lorinda.leonardi@nysed.gov)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 11 October 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File
Rights Holder: New York State Museum


PDD

New Zealand Fungarium

Specialty: Fungi of New Zealand and islands of southern Pacific. Date Founded: 1936.
Contact: Mahajabeen Padamsee (padamseem@landcareresearch.co.nz)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 14 October 2019
IPT / DwC-A Source:
Digital Metadata: EML File


NCSLG

North Carolina State University, Larry F. Grand Mycological Herbarium

The Dr. Larry F. Grand Mycological Herbarium at North Carolina State University is housed in the Department of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University. The collection of fungi currently housed in the herbarium are taxonomically diverse and contains specimens from different ecological habitats largely from North Carolina, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. This collection was established in 1970 and is composed primarily of wood decay (~2900 specimens) and plant pathogenic fungi (~3600 specimens), particularly those associated with species of woody plants found in forest ecosystems. The remaining specimens in the collection consist of mushrooms, jelly, rust, and smut fungi that are represented by approximately 2400 specimens.
Contact: Marc A Cubeta (macubeta@ncsu.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 13 September 2016
Digital Metadata: EML File


OSC

Oregon State University Herbarium

The Oregon State University Herbarium houses approximately 405,000 vascular plant, bryophyte, algal, and fungal specimens. The collections are worldwide in scope, with a focus on the state of Oregon and the Pacific Northwest.
Contact: Joey Spatafora (spatafoj@science.oregonstate.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 8eba92a3-205f-4486-9116-09742e1c5550
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Digital Metadata: EML File


USFWS-PRR

Patuxent Research Refuge - Maryland

Established in 1936 by executive order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the Patuxent Research Refuge is the nation's only national wildlife refuge established to support wildlife research. It is located between Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD. At the time of the Refuge's establishment in 1936, botanist Neil Hotchkiss and other scientists surveyed the flora on the 2,650 acres which made up the Refuge. Lists of plants found on the Refuge were published in 1940 and 1947. The latter list tabulated 877 plant taxa. Voucher specimens were collected and deposited in the Refuge's herbarium. By 1980, when the refuge expanded to 4,741 acres, a total of 969 plant taxa were listed. In the early 1990's as part of the Base Re-alignment and Closure (BRAC) process, the Department of Defense transferred about 8,100 acres of land from Fort Meade to the Department of Interior, with control of the land given to the Fish and Wildlife Service. The addition of this parcel, now known as the North Tract, brought the total acreage of the Refuge to over 12,800 acres. A floral survey of the North Tract began in 2010 and a re-survey of the older parcel of the Refuge, known as the Central and South Tracts, was initiated in 2013. As of October 2018, the herbarium holds over 5,000 voucher specimens from over 1,250 taxa found on the Refuge. This includes a number of Maryland rare, threatened, and endangered (RTE) species and at least five species new to Maryland. A number of duplicate and unique voucher specimens are held by other herbaria. With the collaboration of the Mid-Atlantic Herbarium and the Norton-Brown Herbarium at the University of Maryland, the herbarium is digitizing its voucher specimens collection. Recently, the herbarium has added lichens to its collection. Please feel free to peruse the herbarium's data, but use it with caution as we are still tweaking things. For more information please contact Bill at the email address below.
Contact: Bill Harms (botanybill@verizon.net)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 5e06f896-04e9-4116-93e5-d41a776621d3
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Digital Metadata: EML File


PNW

Purdue University Northwest Mycology

Contact: (stbates@purdue.edu)
Collection Type: General Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: b052ed6d-6ae3-44c7-8863-941ee45fe941
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Digital Metadata: EML File


PUR

Purdue University, Arthur Fungarium

The Arthur Fungarium comprises approximately 120,000 specimens of plant rust fungi. The Fungarium was established in 1​887 by Dr. Joseph C. Arthur​, a pioneer American plant pathologist and mycologist. The Fungarium is housed within the Department of Botany and Plant Pathology at Purdue University and has been considered the most important collection of plant rust fungi in the world collected from a across a broad geographic distribution and historical time line.
Contact: Dr. M. Catherine Aime, Director (maime@purdue.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 6 August 2018
Digital Metadata: EML File


PUL

Purdue University, Kriebel Herbarium

The Kriebel Herbarium comprises approximately 90,000 specimens of vascular plants, algae, bryophytes, lichens and fungi. The vascular plant collection is the oldest in the state of Indiana, originating with John Hussey (1831–1888), Botany Professor and one of the six professors hired to teach the first time Purdue opened its doors in 1874. The Herbarium itself is named in honor of Ralph M. Kriebel (1897–1946), a botanist who joined Purdue in 1943 and whose collection contains in excess of 10,000 specimens of important Indian​a flora. Today’s Kriebel Herbarium consolidates these as well as other collections formerly housed in the Department of Biological Sciences, the Stanley Coulter Herbarium, and the Herbarium of the Purdue Agricultural Experiment Station, and is managed by the Department of Botany and Plant Pathology.
Contact: Dr. M. Catherine Aime (director) (maime@purdue.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 25 January 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


QFB

René Pomerleau Herbarium

Contact: Josyanne Lamarche (Josyanne.Lamarche@canada.ca)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 21 December 2018
Digital Metadata: EML File


E

Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

Contact: David Harris, Curator (herbarium@rbge.org.uk)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 4 September 2018
Digital Metadata: EML File


TRTC

Royal Ontario Museum Fungarium

TRTC holds an estimated half a million fungal collections and about 1,000 type specimens, making it one of the most significant fungal depository in North America. Its holding is richest in Eastern Canadian material but has a worldwide representation. The processing of databasing the specimens is ongoing.
Contact: Jean-Marc Moncalvo, Curator (trtcfungarium@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 7 January 2016
Digital Metadata: EML File


CHRB

Rutgers University, Chrysler Herbarium - Mycology Collection

The Chrysler Herbarium (CHRB) is the last internationally recognized herbarium still in existence in the state of New Jersey. Over 150,000 vascular plant and algal collections, about 7,000 moss and liverwort specimens, and 2,600 lichen specimens form are collection and are arranged and catalogued systematically. The collection is worldwide in scope, with an emphasis on New Jersey and the Mid-Atlantic area, and contains specimens back to the mid-1800s.
Contact: Dr. James White, Mycology Curator (jwhite@sebs.rutgers.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: de4dc41d-b50a-4638-8d6a-7604d3e1abfd
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Digital Metadata: EML File


SFSU

San Francisco State University, Harry D. Thiers Herbarium

The primary research focus of the Harry D. Thiers Herbarium is mycology. Most of the early collections were made by Harry Thiers and his students, and later by Dennis Desjardin and his students. Specialties include fleshy fungi of North America, Hawai'i, Indonesia, and southeast Asia; California lichens, bryophytes, and flowering plants, with an exceptionally large collection of Arctostaphylos. The herbarium was established in 1959 as the SFSU Herbarium, and was renamed the HDT Herbarium following Harry's retirement in 1989.
Contact: Dennis Desjardin (ded@sfsu.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 6d7928b7-550a-4842-9194-317610d85e74
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Digital Metadata: EML File


SBBG

Santa Barbara Botanic Garden

The mycological collection at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden comprises a small but growing set of specimens focused on representing the diversity of macrofungi from the California Channel Islands. This collection complements the lichen (35,500 specimens), bryophyte (500 specimens), and vascular plant (135,000 specimens) holdings at the Garden, which are among the world's best representations of the plant biodiversity of California's Channel Islands, as well as the broader Central Coast region.
Contact: Matt Guilliams (mguilliams@sbbg.org)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: b11da20b-3dc5-4323-a709-099162c7bb34
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Digital Metadata: EML File


LJF

Slovenian Fungal Database (Mikoteka in herbarij Gozdarskega inštituta Slovenije), observation-based

This resource contains records from Slovenian Fungal Database - Boletus informaticus, published March 31st, 2008. It represents the collected data on the species and distribution of fungi in Slovenia from the archives of the Mycological Association of Slovenia, the personal archives of its members, as well as, in part, from existing collections and literature sources. A computer program for inputting data on fungi in Slovenia is called Boletus informaticus. The program is aimed at systematically recording species of fungi, their distribution, and data regarding their habitat. In addition, the program allows for various ways of processing materials, various means of data retrieval, and cartographical presentations of finds. When the related 2005 monograph was published (Dušan Jurc, Andrej Piltaver, Nikica Ogris. 2005. Fungi of Slovenia: species and distribution. Studia forestalia Slovenica, 124, Ljubljana, Slovenian Forestry Institute: 497 p.), there were 114,620 records that describe distribution of 2,452 species of fungi in Slovenia. On March 31st, 2008, the BI database had 160,757 records. These records give distribution to 2763 fungi species. All mentioned records are published here.
Contact: Dr. Nikica Ogris (Curator, Database Administrator) ; Prof. Dr. Dušan Jurc (Professor, Curator for Ascomycetes) (nikica.ogris@gozdis.si ; dusan.jurc@gozdis.si)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 28 February 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


LJF

Slovenian Fungal Database (Mikoteka in herbarij Gozdarskega inštituta Slovenije), specimen-based

This resource contains records from Slovenian Fungal Database - Boletus informaticus, published March 31st, 2008. It represents the collected data on the species and distribution of fungi in Slovenia from the archives of the Mycological Association of Slovenia, the personal archives of its members, as well as, in part, from existing collections and literature sources. A computer program for inputting data on fungi in Slovenia is called Boletus informaticus. The program is aimed at systematically recording species of fungi, their distribution, and data regarding their habitat. In addition, the program allows for various ways of processing materials, various means of data retrieval, and cartographical presentations of finds. When the related 2005 monograph was published (Dušan Jurc, Andrej Piltaver, Nikica Ogris. 2005. Fungi of Slovenia: species and distribution. Studia forestalia Slovenica, 124, Ljubljana, Slovenian Forestry Institute: 497 p.), there were 114,620 records that describe distribution of 2,452 species of fungi in Slovenia. On March 31st, 2008, the BI database had 160,757 records. These records give distribution to 2763 fungi species. All mentioned records are published here.
Contact: Dr. Nikica Ogris (Curator, Database Administrator) ; Prof. Dr. Dušan Jurc (Professor, Curator for Ascomycetes) (nikica.ogris@gozdis.si ; dusan.jurc@gozdis.si)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 1 March 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


CORT

State University of New York College at Cortland

The Herbarium of the State University of New York College at Cortland (CORT) has about 24,000 collections, half of which are macrofungi. Plant collections date back to 1890 with the main holdings accessioned by Dr. Eugene C. Waldbauer and his students in the late 1960’s to late 1990’s. Macrofungal collections were first accessioned in 1980 by Dr. Timothy J. Baroni and his students and continue to be the bulk of the newly added collections to the herbarium. Macrofungi (Basidiomycetes and Ascomycetes) of Upstate New York, and especially the Adirondack Park, are well represented, with collections also from the Southeastern United States, the Gulf Coastal States and California. Collections from Europe (mainly from the Alps), the Greater and Lesser Antilles (Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, St. John USVI, Trinidad), Central America (Belize and Costa Rica), South America (Argentina, Colombia and Venezuela), Mexico and to a lesser extent Thailand and Tasmania are also important components of the research materials curated at Cortland.
Contact: Tim Baroni (Tim.Baroni@cortland.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 5 August 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


SYRF

State University of New York, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry Herbarium

The fungal collections of the College of Environmental Science and Forestry of the State University of New York emphasize wood decay fungi and fungi of the northeastern U.S. There are about 15,000 specimens pertinent to this project, including vouchers for the studies of Josiah Lowe (1938-1993) and his students (including Robert L. Gilbertson and M. J. Larsen). Based on these collections over 75 systematic papers were published (e.g. Lowe, 1963, 1975; Larsen, 1968). SYRF specimens have not yet been digitized, but the data generated by this project, will be maintained by SYRF using appropriate software. This project will not only create an electronic version of the data stored in the herbarium, but also affords the opportunity for an advanced undergraduate student or graduate student to learn digitization techniques.
Contact: Alexander Weir (aweir@esf.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: f9d2e3a0-7396-41d7-ab74-e9bab47de676
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Digital Metadata: EML File


SWAT

Swat University Fungarium

The Swat University Herbarium was started in 2015, five years after the foundation of the University. It is currently in temporary housing on the main Grand Trunk Rd through Odigram but will move to its own building at the Charbagh Campus when construction has been completed. Swat lies at the junction of three major mountain ranges: Himalayas, Hindukush, and Karakorum. It is home to an enormously diverse flora, one that contains Central Asian, European, and Himalayan elements. A high proportion of its taxa are endemic, or nearly endemic, to the region and many of its species are rare. There are also many taxa that are highly valued as medicinal plants. The fungal flora is less well known but it can be expected to have comparable diversity. The Centre for Plant Sciences and Biodiversity Conservation is home to experts in several plant groups and macrofungi.
Contact: Dr. Zahid Ullah (zahidmatta@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: a354c62f-d8f9-47a9-a775-c3b76c5cafec
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Digital Metadata: EML File
Rights Holder: University of Swat


S

Swedish Museum of Natural History

This collection contains about 32 000 species and 370 000 specimens. Important collections: G. Bresadola E. Rehm P. and H. Sydow (before 1919) P. Hennings L. Romell P. Dietel
Contact: Arne Anderberg, Director of Botany (arne.anderberg@nrm.se)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 15 October 2018
Digital Metadata: EML File


BPI

United States National Fungus Collections

The USDA-ARS U.S. National Fungus Collections (BPI) currently houses approximately one-million reference specimens. Data associated with over 800,000 specimens have been computerized and are available on-line. In addition reports of fungi on plants provide a comprehensive account of the host range and geographic distribution of fungi on plants throughout the world. Data are continuously added to the databases from herbarium specimens and newly published fungus-host distributions and disease reports. Additional databases contain taxonomic literature references and accurate scientific names of plant pathogenic fungi.
Contact: Lisa A. Castlebury (Lisa.Castlebury@ARS.USDA.GOV)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 3 September 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


IBUG

Universidad de Guadalajara

[NOTE: IBUG does not have herbarium numbers; the Catalog Number for IBUG is just a series of numbers starting at 1 used to number the specimen records.]
Contact: Laura Guzmán Dávalos (lguzman@cucba.udg.mx)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 4df63b59-5a8f-4a0a-9654-402af5946a21
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Digital Metadata: EML File


CMMF

Université de Montréal, Cercle des Mycologues de Montréal Fungarium

The Cercle des mycologues de Montréal Fungarium is a relatively recent collection, founded in 1988. The collection holds fungi collected by Yves Lamoureux, scientific advisor of the Cercle des mycologues de Montréal (CMM - http://www.mycomontreal.qc.ca/) over a twenty years period, and by members of the CMM and other amateur mycological societies. It includes more than 5000 dried specimens of macrofungi (Fungi) and some slime molds (Amoebozoa, formerly Myxomycetes) of Quebec and neighbouring provinces/states, representing about 2000 species. Almost all specimens were photographed before drying.
Contact: Raymond Archambault, Curator (raymond.archambault@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 11 January 2016
Digital Metadata: EML File


UACCC

University of Alabama Chytrid Culture Collection

Contact: Martha Powell & Peter Letcher (mpowell@ua.edu; letch006@ua.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: b09eb981-50eb-4f19-bfa8-b70196852af7
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Digital Metadata: EML File


ARIZ

University of Arizona, Gilbertson Mycological Herbarium, observation-based

The Gilbertson Mycological Herbarium at the University of Arizona houses over 40,000 accessioned specimens of fungi and fungus-like organisms, with special collections of rusts, polypores, and corticioid fungi. Our holdings are global in origin, with special attention to the macrofungi of Arizona.
Contact: A. Elizabeth (Betsy) Arnold (arnold@ag.arizona.edu)
Collection Type: Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 21ddb5df-b839-48b7-b6ee-e315875fc509
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Digital Metadata: EML File


ARIZ

University of Arizona, Gilbertson Mycological Herbarium, specimen-based

The Gilbertson Mycological Herbarium at the University of Arizona houses over 40,000 accessioned specimens of fungi and fungus-like organisms, with special collections of rusts, polypores, and corticioid fungi. Our holdings are global in origin, with special attention to the macrofungi of Arizona.
Contact: A. Elizabeth (Betsy) Arnold (arnold@ag.arizona.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: eac471ae-8567-413e-9d11-5df79955dbe7
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Digital Metadata: EML File


UARK

University of Arkansas Fungarium

Contact: Steve Stephenson (slsteph@uark.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: c9d5eb7e-3552-4665-ab69-11e1357488b4
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Digital Metadata: EML File


UBC

University of British Columbia Herbarium

The University of British Columbia Herbarium is the largest in Canada west of Ottawa, and is home to over half a million plant specimens from around the world. This collection is critical to the identification, monitoring, and conservation of plant biodiversity in British Columbia, and is an important resource for education and scientific research. The UBC Herbarium has five major collections: vascular plants (flowering plants, conifers, ferns, and their relatives); bryophytes (mosses, liverworts and hornworts); macroscopic algae (mostly seaweeds); lichens; and fungi. In addition to the world's largest collection of BC plants, our internationally recognized bryophyte collection is the largest in Canada. We also have important collections of Pacific algae, fungi, Hawaiian plants and tropical prayer plants.
Contact: Olivia Lee, Collections Manager, Bryophytes, (ubc.herbarium@ubc.ca)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 4 December 2018
IPT / DwC-A Source:
Digital Metadata: EML File


UC

University of California Berkeley, University Herbarium

Contact: Margriet Wetherwax (margriet@berkeley.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: f554e354-c444-40bf-90e9-6fcbec94da3e
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Digital Metadata: EML File


UCSC

University of California Santa Cruz Fungal Herbarium

The UCSC Fungal Herbarium is a small but powerful collection comprising hundreds of collections from the Pacific states, as well as a few from farther abroad (including the eastern United States and Mexico). Our herbarium is set apart by the high quality of photography and metadata accompanying the collections. The breadth and depth of collections from the Redwood Coast bioregion in particular makes this an excellent resource for ecologists. Contributions of funding and logistial support from the Fungus Federation of Santa Cruz and ongoing work by students of the UCSC MycoTeam have made it possible to pair microscopic data, and in many cases, DNA sequences with our collections.
Contact: Christian Schwarz (cfs.myko@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: d8931266-37ec-48a6-be43-6c81a35a71da
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Digital Metadata: EML File


LA

University of California, Los Angeles

The UCLA Herbarium (LA) was founded in ca. 1930, and contains approximately 200,000 specimens, almost entirely vascular plants, including the collections of Carl Epling, Harlan Lewis, Peter Raven, Henry J. Thompson, Jonathan Sauer, Elizabeth McClintock, and Lawrence Kiefer. Geographically, the herbarium collections include North American and European specimens, as well as plants of California, including a comprehensive collection from the Santa Monica Mountains.
Contact: Thomas Huggins, Collections Manager (huggins@ucla.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: ddc70508-ea6b-45e8-bd90-cec4ebebc06d
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Digital Metadata: EML File


CSU

University of Central Oklahoma Herbarium

The fungal collections of CSU emphasize agarics, boletes and related macrofungi mainly from Oklahoma, Texas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Central and South America. There are approximately 4,000 specimens in the herbarium that are pertinent to this project, including vouchers for the studies of Clark Ovrebo and his students (e.g. please site some references). CSU also contains approximately 1000 images of specimens in the living condition, and about 1700 fieldnotes.
Contact: Clark Ovrebo (covrebo@uco.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 56bff0cb-5002-4177-993b-85b57191869f
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Digital Metadata: EML File


CINC

University of Cincinnati, Margaret H. Fulford Herbarium

Contact: Eric Tepe, Curator (eric.tepe@uc.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: a999d4c6-4c06-4515-9af3-a7e63b31c0f9
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Digital Metadata: EML File


C

University of Copenhagen

The database for fungi includes p.t. ca. 47.000 records from the fungal herbarium. Most of them have been obtained after 1990 and all newly received collections will be digitized. In connection with loans, research and similar purposes also older collections have been digitized, but there is not enough resources to digitize the whole herbarium. Each collection is presented with the Danish name, the Latin name, the country of origin, the locality, the collector and the person, who identified the species. Furthermore the date of collection and any notes given on the habitat is shown. A rough taxonomical guide can be searched, separating the fungi into 14 groups. Also, it is possible to search for collections from a country. When using the database it should be kept in mind that the taxonomy of the fungi is changing very rapidly these years, due to the molecular results. Therefore, the database is not necessarily reflecting the latest results and opinions on taxonomy. The base is updated regularly (1-2 times a year) and the update will also include new names. The database is constructed and maintained in dbase by Peer Corfixen. Christian Lange made the interface and adapted the search-part in Filemaker/Windows. Henning Knudsen is scientifically responsible. Notes In 2004 the Botanical Museum, the Library, the Botanical Garden, the Zoological Museum, and the Geological Museum were merged and became the Natural History Museum of Denmark. The Natural History Museum is a department of the University of Copenhagen. Museum Botanicum Hauniense = C. Herbarium C is housed in temporary premises within an hour's travel outside Copenhagen until 2020 while we build a new Natural History Museum in the Botanical Gardens in Copenhagen. Please note the Danish Greenlandic collections are currently without curation, but accessible to the extent possible through our curatorial managers.
Contact: Nikolaj Scharff (nscharff@snm.ku.dk)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 20 May 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


FLAS

University of Florida Herbarium

The University of Florida Herbarium is a unit of the Department of Natural History of the Florida Museum of Natural History. The herbarium is affiliated with the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Biology and the Department of Plant Pathology. The FLAS acronym is the standard international abbreviation for the University of Florida Herbarium. It is derived from the herbarium's early association with the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. Our mission focuses in plant collections acquisition and care, research based on the collections, education and public service.
Contact: Matthew E. Smith (trufflesmith@ufl.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: a1aa8e0a-d122-4fff-96df-0a83f585a2de
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Digital Metadata: EML File


GAM

University of Georgia, Julian H. Miller Mycological Herbarium

The Julian H. Miller Mycological Herbarium (GAM) is an internationally recognized collection of fungi with an estimated 30,500 specimens that is a unit of the Georgia Museum of Natural History of the University of Georgia. The herbarium collections are especially strong in plant pathogenic ascomycetes; although, the majority of specimens are from Georgia and the southeastern USA. Specimens in the collection date back to the late 1800’s, including exsiccati of J.B. Ellis and M.B. Everhart and A.B. Seymour and F. S. Earle. Other important collections are the Forest Disease Fungi acquired from the USDA Forest Service in Athens, which includes the rust collections of George Hepting and the Coleosporium collection of George Hedgcock, a large collection of Georgia myxomycetes and a collection of Georgia lichens.
Contact: Dr. Richard Hanlin (herbgam@uga.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 88e7bf1d-8e3b-4ad8-9089-448537a682ac
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Digital Metadata: EML File


HAW-F

University of Hawaii, Joseph F. Rock Herbarium

Founded in 1908, the Joseph F. Rock Herbarium (HAW) serves the official university repository for plant specimens associated with student, staff, and faculty teaching and research. The herbaria was created by Dr. Joseph F. Rock's original collections and is the oldest herbaria in Hawaii. It is the result of decades of plant exploration by some of the leading researchers in the Pacific basin and today its use continues to expand. The herbarium is part of the University Museum Consortium, and comprises approximately 60,000 dried preserved plant specimens including algae, bryophytes, pteridophytes, angiosperms, fungi, and ancillary collections of 35 mm slides, wood, seed, and DNA. For more than 100 years, the herbarium has been a focal point for teaching, training, and education on the flora of Hawai'i and the Pacific with particular emphasis on vascular plants. Since 2009, the herbarium has also managed the departments living collection in the St. John Courtyard Botanical Garden.
Contact: Michael Thomas, Collections Manager (mbthomas@hawaii.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 6b75163b-1458-44f5-a991-2afab0b5d021
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Digital Metadata: EML File


ILL

University of Illinois Herbarium

Illinois, midwestern U.S., Apiaceae, Asteraceae, Fabaceae: Mimosoideas, fossils of Pennsylvanian age coal balls, fungi (especially Meliolales: Ascomycetes and resupinate Basidiomycetes), 19th and early 20th century exsiccatae.
Contact: Andrew Miller (amiller7@illinois.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: be338a02-55b6-4ce9-a196-e3a6343b6689
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Digital Metadata: EML File


ILLS

University of Illinois, Illinois Natural History Survey Fungarium

The herbarium contains 250,000 plant specimens and the fungarium contains 75,000 fungal specimens.
Specialty: Vascular plants and fungi of Illinois, southeastern and midwestern U.S., Great Smoky Mountains National Park; limited neotropical; recent Kyrgyzstan; Rosaceae subfamily Maloideae.
Date Founded: 1858.
Contact: Andrew Miller, Ph.D., Mycologist and Director (amiller7@illinois.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 15 January 2020
Digital Metadata: EML File


KANU-KU-F

University of Kansas, R. L. McGregor Herbarium

The Biodiversity Institute collections include 9 million specimens of plants, animals and fossils collected worldwide and 1.2 million archaeological artifacts. For more than 140 years, KU scientists and students have collected and studied life on Earth. Our specimens of plants and animals — prehistoric to living species, microscopic to colossal — have been gathered from every continent and ocean. Our archaeological artifacts document the past cultures of the Great Plains. Biodiversity Institute collections include DNA samples, sound recordings, images, tissues, skeletons and field notes. With powerful tools of information technology, we harness the data associated with our collections to forecast critical environmental events, such as the spread of diseases, invasive species and agricultural pests, and the effects of climate change.
Contact: Craig Freeman, Director (ccfree@ku.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 86dbfb1a-c2b1-459a-bcec-027466bb13ae
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Digital Metadata: EML File


MAINE

University of Maine, Richard Homola Mycological Herbarium

The University of Maine herbarium consists of mycology, lichen, algae, and plant collections. The Richard Homola Mycological collection at the University of Maine dates from the 1850’s and consists of approximately 10,000 fungal specimens, excluding lichens. The early collections from 1850s through early 1950s focused largely on plant pathogens, particularly rusts, from North America. The focus of the macrofungi collection is specimens of Basidiomycota from Maine. Some specimens date from the 1850s, but the bulk of the macrofungi (8000 specimens) was collected by Dr. Richard Homola from 1960’s to 1999 in Maine and North America. Dr. Homola also took excellent 35mm photographic slides and scanning electron micrographs of his specimens; the vast majority of which are vouchered in the Homola collection.
Contact: Seanna L. Annis (sannis@maine.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 1 September 2017
Digital Metadata: EML File


MICH

University of Michigan Herbarium

The fungal herbarium is extraordinarily strong in North American higher fungi, with, among others, the collections of A. H. Smith (agarics, boletes, and gastromycetes), C. H. Kauffman (agarics), D. Baxter (polypores), R. L. Shaffer (agarics), and R. Fogel (hypogeous fungi). Material on which the taxonomic studies of E. B. Mains, on the Uredinales, insecticolous fungi, and Geoglossaceae, and of B. Kanouse, on discomycetes are largely based is in the collection, as are many of L. E. Wehmeyer's pyrenomycetous fungi. The personal herbarium of F. K. Sparrow, which contains mostly specimens of the parasitic genera Physoderma and Urophlyctis as well as a microscope-slide collection of aquatic fungi, is also included. The fungal herbarium is rich in the classical mycological exsiccati sets and contains several historically important, originally private collections such as those of H. A. Kelly and H. C. Beardslee Jr.
Contact: Timothy Y. James, Curator of Fungi - see home page for loan request information (tyjames@umich.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 0cd2551b-8166-4c05-a0c9-5c8712ce0eb8
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Digital Metadata: EML File


MIN

University of Minnesota, Bell Museum of Natural History Herbarium Fungal Collection

The Bell Museum Fungal Herbarium collections date from the 1880's and consist of approximately 100,000 specimens, excluding the lichens. About 10% of the specimens are of Minnesota fungi; the remainder are from North America and elsewhere.

Intensive scientific investigation of Minnesota fungi occurred from about 1885 to 1910 supported by the Geological and Natural History Survey of Minnesota. Collections made between 1910 and 1960 focused on plant disease fungi. Renewed interest in documenting fleshy fungi began in the 1960's and has expanded in recent years with the increased emphasis on the analysis of biodiversity.
Contact: Anita Cholewa (chole001@umn.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 14 March 2019
IPT / DwC-A Source:
Digital Metadata: EML File


MISS

University of Mississippi

Contact: Lucile McCook (bymccook@olemiss.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 2ea93dfb-68f6-415f-8df2-6b7757a67c35
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Digital Metadata: EML File


MONTU

University of Montana Herbarium

The Herbarium at The University of Montana (MONTU, http://herbarium.dbs.umt.edu) contains over 150,000 plant specimens and has the largest and best representation of the flora of the Northern Rocky Mountains in the world. The Herbarium is particularly well-known for its collections from the alpine and montane regions of Montana. Our vascular plant collections can be accessed via http://pnwherbaria.org. MONTU is also home to the Montana Diatom collection (http://herbarium.dbs.umt.edu/diatoms.asp), and we are excited to have our fungi collection included in the Mycoportal Database.
Contact: Marilyn Marler (Marilyn.marler@umontana.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 9d863f79-0cb6-4493-9872-8f72d6c79e69
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Digital Metadata: EML File


NEB

University of Nebraska State Museum, C.E. Bessey Herbarium

The Bessey Herbarium was founded in 1874, making it among the oldest in the Great Plains states of Colorado, Kansas, Montana, North Dakota, and Nebraska. The collection has more than 310,000 specimens, placing it among the largest in the Great Plains. The largest parts of the collection are, in descending order, from Nebraska, the Great Plains, the Rocky Mountains, other parts of North America, and Europe. It contains important collections by such scientifically notable Nebraskans as Charles Bessey, Ernst Bessey, Frederic Clements, Walter Kiener, Per Rydberg, Raymond Pool, Jared G. Smith; by other Nebraskans who later became prominent in other fields, such as Roscoe Pound (Law), Louise Pound (Literature), Willa Cather (Literature), Melvin Gilmore (Ethnobotany), Lawrence Bruner (Entomology) and Henry Baldwin Ward (Parasitology); and by many prominent scientists from outside the state.
Contact: Robert Kaul, Curator (rkaul1@unl.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 227d278c-4603-4e6e-845c-941e964a2815
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Digital Metadata: EML File


UNM-Fungi

University of New Mexico Herbarium Mycological Collection

The Museum of Southwestern Biology houses New Mexico’s largest herbarium. Our focus is mainly to document and preserve a record of the flora of the state. We have 130,000 specimens; most are from New Mexico and the southwestern U.S. Our primary international holdings are from Mexico. As the fifth largest state we are relatively unexplored and species new to science are still being discovered, documented, and described. Our specimens represent over 7700 species and serve as a reference for what’s been documented within our region.
Additional UNM Collections:
Bryophyte Collection within the CNABH Portal
Lichen Collection within the CNALH Portal
Vascular Plant Collection within SEINet
Contact: Phil Tonne (ptonne@unm.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: ed2681f9-b7fa-4353-93a4-9e821371d458
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Digital Metadata: EML File


NCU

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Herbarium

The University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Herbarium (NCU) was founded in 1908 by William Chambers Coker and is a Department within the North Carolina Botanical Garden of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. NCU has ca. 17,000 macrofungi (esp. collections of William Chambers Coker & John Nathaniel Couch) and ca. 20,000 microfungi (esp. collections of Arthur Bliss Seymour). Cataloging of our macrofungi is complete; cataloging of our microfungi in mycoportal.org started in October, 2015. The Herbarium also curates vascular plants (world-wide, but with focus on native flora of Southeastern USA); red marine algae of temperate zone (esp. collections of Max Hommersand & Paul Gabrielson); lichens & bryophytes of southeastern USA (esp. collections of Gary Perlmutter); and plant fossils of the Devonian age (esp. collections of Patricia Gensel). NCU is located in the center of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Campus and welcomes visitors & researchers. Contact Curator for information on hours & parking.
Contact: Carol Ann McCormick (mccormick@unc.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 355fda57-2668-4dfd-b7b8-0acce4d45271
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Digital Metadata: EML File


URV

University of Richmond

Contact: John Hayden (jhayden@richmond.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 8e3fa355-8792-4a8c-ae9b-e0d2f8076d8e
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Digital Metadata: EML File


USAM

University of South Alabama Herbarium

The mycology herbarium was started in 2005. It consists mostly of Agaricomycetes from southern Alabama and neighboring Gulf Coast states.
Contact: Juan Luis Mata (jmata@southalabama.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 50c94508-8e26-4380-927d-cd4e746dd30c
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Digital Metadata: EML File


USCH-Fungi

University of South Carolina, A. C. Moore Herbarium

The A. C. Moore Herbarium is an important part of the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of South Carolina (Columbia Campus). Founded in 1907 by Dr. Andrew Charles Moore, the original collection of dried plant specimens is now part of an ever growing collection. Total holdings are just over 100,000 specimens, making the A. C. Moore Herbarium the largest in the state of South Carolina. Researchers and visitors will find a diverse collection of vascular and nonvascular plant material primarily from the Southeastern United States and more specifically from South Carolina. Now over 100 years old, the A. C. Moore Herbarium continues to be an indispensable resource for botanical knowledge.
Contact: Dr. John B. Nelson (nelson@sc.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: bcea7d47-7f20-4969-b370-fb33c09531ef
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Digital Metadata: EML File


USF

University of South Florida Herbarium

The collections of fungi (excluding lichens) at the USF Herbarium consist of a few hundred specimens. Most specimens were collected in Florida during the 21st century and many include photos of the living specimen. Continuing collections focus on documenting the fungi of Florida.
Contact: Alan Franck (afranck@mail.usf.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 24eeafec-4c38-4fe8-8807-8fc5da9dee9d
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Digital Metadata: EML File


TENN-F

University of Tennessee Fungal Herbarium

The University of Tennessee fungal herbarium (TENN FU) comprises 63,000 barcoded and databased specimens emphasizing the southeastern North America but with significant collections from New Zealand and China. Approximately 54,000 specimens are pertinent to this project and include voucher specimens for studies of Hesler, Petersen and students.

Contact: Brandon Matheny (pmatheny@utk.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 97e2d271-3744-48a3-92b5-5a86afbfb01d
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Digital Metadata: EML File


UCHT

University of Tennessee, Chattanooga

Contact: Hill Craddock (Hill-Craddock@utc.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 27e5f1d7-ab45-4cc6-bc91-f2ff98ff10f1
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Digital Metadata: EML File


VT

University of Vermont, Pringle Herbarium, Macrofungi

The Pringle Herbarium (VT) contains 300,000 specimens, including vascular plants, bryophytes, lichens, algae and fungi. Of these, this portal contains about 2000 fungi specimens, including all of our specimens of macrofungi. Other digitization projects cover type specimens, vascular plant specimens, North American bryophytes and lichens, and macroalgae. These images and data are available through various portals. The herbarium does not maintain its own online database.
Contact: David S. Barrington (dbarring@uvm.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 4171da63-cd34-4f53-a494-16d502507003
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Digital Metadata: EML File
Rights Holder: University of Vermont


WTU

University of Washington Herbarium

The University of Washington Herbarium's total holdings number over 600,000 specimens of vascular and nonvascular plants, fungi, lichens, and marine algae. The mycological collection consists of over 48,000 specimens (350 of these being types) primarily from Washington and Oregon.
Contact: David Giblin (wtu@u.washington.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 11 April 2019
Digital Metadata: EML File


WIS

University of Wisconsin-Madison Herbarium

The University of Wisconsin-Madison Herbarium, founded in 1849, is a museum collection of dried, labeled fungi of state, national and international importance, which is used extensively for taxonomic and ecological research, as well as for teaching and public service. Today WIS is estimated to hold >1.2 million specimens of algae, fungi, lichens, and plants, placing it among the top 1% of the world’s largest herbarium. It is ranked 17th largest in the world outside of Europe, 11th largest in the Western Hemisphere, 10th largest in the USA, and the 3rd largest public university herbarium in the Americas.
Contact: Kenneth M. Cameron (kmcameron@wisc.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 87505ca2-da02-4939-8798-5d403c72b535
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Digital Metadata: EML File


UWSP

University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Herbarium

Starting with one cabinet of about 1,000 plant specimens in 1969, Dr. Robert Freckmann (and Dr. Frank W. Bowers) built this herbarium into the third largest in Wisconsin, with over 200,000 specimens.
Contact: Stephanie Lyon (Stephanie.Lyon@uwsp.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: d5fc7575-a3f0-4211-bb96-4da84624f4aa
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Digital Metadata: EML File


RMS

University of Wyoming, Wilhelm G. Solheim Mycological Herbarium

Wilhelm G. Solheim Mycological Herbarium (RMS) at the University of Wyoming was formally established in 1979.  It contains 49,000 specimens, mostly of microfungi, that represent the life's work of Dr. Solheim (50 years). Many of the specimens were acquired through exchange. It represents the largest collection of fungi from the Rocky Mountain region.

The collection is associated with the Rocky Mountain Herbarium which contains 1.2 million specimens of vascular plants of which 750,000 are databased and georeferrenced.
Contact: Burrell “Ernie” Nelson (bnelsonn@uwyo.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 53b69cf0-a097-4840-91ed-a1eb33f8ded2
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Digital Metadata: EML File


CFMR

USDA Forest Service, Center for Forest Mycology Research

The Herbarium at the Center for Forest Mycology Research at the Forest Products Laboratory is a national repository for the collections of wood decay fungi collected by mycologists since the early 1900's. The herbarium was added to CFMR in 1998. It is estimated that about 70,000 specimens are housed in the collection. USDA Division of Forest Pathology (BFDL); Moved and renamed (after 1981) USDA Forest Service, Center for Forest Mycology Research (CFMR)
Contact: Beatriz Ortiz-Santana (bortizsantana@fs.fed.us)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 8 January 2020
Digital Metadata: EML File


FPF

USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station

Specializes in forest fungi of Rocky Mountains and southwestern U.S.; Phoradendron of U.S. and northern Mexico; Arceuthobium worldwide. The collection includes 4622 accessions of fungi from western North America collected 1890 to 1960 that represent fungi causing tree diseases and wood decays. Founded in 1952. Currently housed in the RMRS in Flagstaff, Arizona. Contains an estimated 12,000 specimens.
Contact: Brian Geils (bgeils@npgcable.com)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 3bb71ab5-e52c-4b41-b160-4587e5fa7a45
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Digital Metadata: EML File


USU-UTC

Utah State University, Intermountain Herbarium

The geographic focus of the Intermountain Herbarium is the area between the Sierra Nevada and the Rocky Mountains. The fungal collection includes both macrofungi and plant pathogens. Most of the macrofungi are from northern Utah. Dr. Bradley R. Kropp is Curator of Fungi. The herbarium's Assistant Curator, Michael B. Piep, is also a mycologist.
Contact: Michael Piep (michael.piep@usu.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 4c1d61ad-d84b-4f0b-b50d-7c1376bcfed6
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Digital Metadata: EML File


VSC

Valdosta State University Herbarium

The Valdosta State University Herbarium (VSC) provides a repository for the preservation of voucher specimens that document the flora of the Coastal Plain region of Georgia and specimens from a broader geographical area that might be useful in the study of the flora of this region and that enable specialized research on particular groups of plants carried out by faculty and students in residence at Valdosta State University and by taxonomic specialists at other institutions. VSC also provides specimens for use in teaching, and its staff responds to requests from the general public, natural resource managers, agricultural scientists, and others by providing information about plants and service determinations of unknown plants and, where appropriate, preserving vouchers relating to such.
Contact: Emily Cantonwine (egcantonwine@valdosta.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 2bc379a2-4da7-4fc3-b964-ebb1f45ee215
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Digital Metadata: EML File


VPI

Virginia Tech University, Massey Herbarium

The mycological collections at Virginia Tech include primarily Basidiomycetes with emphases on the Agaricales, Boletales, Gasteromycetes, and the Aphyllophorales. In addition, a small Ascomycete collection with emphasis on Discomycetes is present. The collection has been a pivotal part of the program of teaching and research in mycology over the past from 1970 through 2005. With the retirement of Dr. Orson K. Miller, the mycological collection entered a static stage in terms of growth. In 2012, the bulk of the collection was transferred to the New York Botanical Garden with 5400 specimens from the Southeastern United States remaining at VPI. Many collections are complemented by fresh notes, color transparencies and black and white negatives. A Microsoft Access database contains nearly 15,000 records, including all specimens currently housed at VPI. The mycological herbarium is participated in the Macrofungi Collections Consortium Digitization Project during 2013-2014 and is now available online.

Prior to being moved to the New York Botanical Garden, the collection contained an estimated 29,500 specimens. Geographical coverage included major collections from Virginia and the Appalachian region, central Idaho and northwestern Montana. In addition, an Alaskan collection numbered more than 6000 with emphasis on arctic and alpine tundra fungi. Major foreign collection were from Europe, Western Australia, Republic of Korea and from The Greater Antilles, especially Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Jamaica. Additional collections came from Canada, Japan, South Africa, and Thailand. Those interested in consulting specimens from outside the SE United States region should contact the New York Botanical Garden.
Contact: Dr. Jordan Metzgar (metzgar@vt.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 6 April 2015
Digital Metadata: EML File


WSP

Washington State University, Charles Gardner Shaw Mycological Herbarium

The Charles Gardner Shaw Mycological Herbarium contains approximately 70,000 fungal specimens. Important collections of smut fungi (G. W. Fischer, R. Duran, L. M. Carris, K. Vanky); downy mildew fungi (C. G. Shaw); powdery mildew fungi (D. A. Glawe); pyrenomycetes (J. D. Rogers); fungi on grasses (R. Sprague). Shaw's Host-Fungus Index for the Pacific Northwest is on-line. Parasitic and wood-decay fungi of Pacific Northwest; grass-parasitic fungi of U.S.; smut fungi; rust fungi; powdery mildews; downy mildews; Xylariaceae, Diatrypaceae, and other pyrenomycetes worldwide.
Contact: Lori Carris (carris@wsu.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: a86f1b5e-693d-48d5-96ab-36f4bdd1be7e
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Digital Metadata: EML File


WSC

Western Colorado University Herbarium

Contact: Amy Honan (ahonan@western.edu)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 287519f8-be60-44a7-afff-e3477231e42e
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Digital Metadata: EML File


YSU-F

Yugra State University Fungarium, specimen-based

The reference specimen collection of Yugra State University currently stores about 5000 specimens of fungi, mosses, hepatics and vascular plants. It was initially based on private collections of several researchers working on biodiversity assessment in Western Siberia. In 2015 the major part of collection was imported to the database management system Specify. The collection is registered in Index Herbariorum since 2016. Main goal of the YSU Biological Collection (YSU BC) is to accumulate biological collections and manage associated biodiversity information in the Khanty-Mansiyskiy Autonomous okrug – Yugra. For that purpose, we are developing conditions for physical storage of samples, facilitating their scientific analysis, and applying computer technologies for storage, analysis and distribution of biodiversity data. We encourage researchers working in the area to share their biological collections with YSU BC. A rule for the visitors of YSU Mukhrino field station was set since 2016 to share their collected material with the host university.
Contact: Nina Filippova (filippova.courlee.nina@gmail.com)
Collection Type: Preserved Specimens
Management: Data snapshot of local collection database
Last Update: 1 November 2018
Digital Metadata: EML File
Usage Rights: CC BY (Attribution)
Rights Holder: Yugra State University


MP

General Observation and Personal Collections

Personal research data managed directly within data portal. This data node allows researchers to enter, manage, and print labels for their field data before specimens are deposited within a public collection. The records are considered 'observations' until the specimens are formally accessioned and a physical specimen available to researchers within a public institution.
Contact: MyCoPortal Administrator (mycoportal.contact@gmail.com)
Collection Type: General Observations
Management: Live Data managed directly within data portal
Global Unique Identifier: 5a2ec9f3-29e6-4fac-90bc-90652e5eeacd
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Digital Metadata: EML File